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Posts Tagged ‘Paddock’

The Gaudy by Paddock

Posted by shirleycurran on 8 November 2019

I was all set to mutter about a setter expecting us to write our own clues (though, come to think of it, that is not such a bad idea – I have an inkling that the majority of setters prefer creating the grid to setting the clues – I remember how we smiled when one budding setter announced that he had some great grids drawn up but was looking for a co-setter to do the clue-writing). However, when I read through Paddock’s clues, I was speedily distracted by the alcohol absolutlely dripping through them and forgot that we had some clue writing to do.

‘Trump’s restricting acceptable drinking vessels at Turnberry (5)’ “Ah, that’s a Scottish indicator isn’t it?” I asked, and the other numpty confirmed that we needed a Scots word for those vessels CUPS around A giving us CAUPS. ‘One may scoff at returning wine bottles (5)’ We decided that the RED was the returning wine and that that bottles (contains) AT = IN, so it was a DINER at Trump’s golf course doing the scoffing and emptying of the bottles. ‘Scots lament only drinking in moderation (5)’ (Depends what we are drinking doesn’t it – it’s a shame to drink one of those fine vintage Taliskers that we were drinking on Lewis a couple of weeks ago in anything other than moderation!) However, we put HO (‘moderation’, as well as an unspeakable US variant) into ONE (= ONLY) and had our Scots lament, OHONE. Paddock hadn’t finished: ‘Titled soak knocked back “medicine” (6)’ One has to wonder what he was drinking but we reversed RET, added MED and entered TERMED. What can I say? Cheers, Paddock!

Those clues we had to partly write ourselves took us much longer than they should have done to twig. ‘Felt revulsion at shifting [3.4] bodies about (5)’ gave us HATED and suggested THE DEAD, but that led me on a wild goose chase. Teaching James Joyce’s The Dead is not one of my most memorable educational experiences but that seemed to be a likely candidate, and a number of other authors (Agatha Christie, Stephen King …) produced likely candidates for our author and series of novels, but it wasn’t until OF JERICHO appeared (Brave Joshua’s first to come out [2,7] after collapse (6)’ [J]ERICHO* less J, that we finally saw the light. “It’s Morse!”

Wiki kindly provided a list and we saw Last Bus to Woodstock, The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn, Last Seen Wearing, Service of all the Dead, The Dead of Jericho, The Riddle of the Third Mile, Death is Now my Neighbour and The Remorseful Day. All that remained was to fit those extra letters DE that had been omitted from the clue to CODEX into another word to produce that penultimate title. There was only one place to do that and we converted LOATH to DEATH then saw, with delight, that DEATH was now the neighbour of our setter PADDOCK.

We had two new words, DEATH and FLEURY and when we extracted their letters from THE REMORSEFUL DAY, what did we see? MORSE, of course. We had to place him somewhere else in the grid and CODEX was the obvious location and produced only real words. A fine achievement, Thank you Paddock.

 

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Listener No 4577: The Gaudy by Paddock

Posted by Dave Hennings on 8 November 2019

Paddock’s third Listener hit us this week, following on from a game of Battleships in 2016 and Ovid’s Metamorphoses last year. Here we had an interesting clueing technique with phrases from book titles had to become part of the clues signified by their word lengths in square brackets.

The first such clue that I got was 14ac Brave Joshua’s first to come out [2 7] after collapse (6) where what looked like HEROIC with J(oshua) gave us of Jericho as the book title bit. I’m afraid I’m not an expert on that Oxford detective, but I recalled that one of the books was [checks Wiki] The Dead of Jericho. That revelation came fairly early in my solve, but little did it help me with the other book titles that we’d need. I knew that the last was going to be The Remorseful Day, but that belonged to the endgame.

A few clues stood out for me:

15ac CODEX Against banning new “adults only” book that hasn’t been printed (5)
CON – N + X (with the wordplay for DE omitted
19dn SEEDCASE Judge going over statements to court accepts conclusion of Raymond Burr, maybe (8)
SEE + CASE around (Raymon)D
22dn FLATLET Low-rent accommodation (7)
FLAT-LET
 
One clue made me shudder with its reference to some bloke:

7dn AXOIDS      Figures old Tory leader no longer supports a vote (6)
O + IDS (say no more) after (A + X)
 
And so the restored clues gave us:

14ac HEROIC Brave Joshua’s first to come out [The Dead] of Jericho after collapse (6)
35ac LENSES Loony [Last] Seen Wearing extreme pair of ladies’ glasses (6)
6dn WORDLESS [The] Silent World [of Nicholas Quinn desolated, being short of energy (8)
10dn TRACE Spot one’s Last Bus [to Woodstock] close to midnight, heading north (5)
27dn HATED Felt revulsion at shifting [Service of All] the Dead bodies about (5)
33dn ARMS Limbs are beginning to suffer around marathon’s [The Riddle of the] Third Mile (4)
 
Finally, the DE from CODEX moved to the LO of LOATH to suggest Death is Now My Neighbour (or at least Paddock’s at 30ac) and the letters from DEATH, FLEURY and MORSE (replacing CODEX) gave us The Remorseful Day.

Thanks for the entertainment, Paddock.
 

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L4577: ‘The Gaudy’ by Paddock

Posted by Encota on 8 November 2019

I don’t know about you … but for me the theme for this neat puzzle by Paddock dropped out quite quickly. 14ac read:

Brave Joshua’s first to come out [2 7] after collapse (6)

… where the square bracketed part was explained by the Preamble to be part of a novel’s title. What with ‘Heroic’ being a synonym for ‘Brave’ then it looked very much like JHEROIC* being part of the book title and that looked very much like Jericho. But isn’t that part of a Morse novel’s title &/or part of Oxford? Ah yes, ‘The Dead of Jericho‘. After that the others soon became clear.

15ac originally solved as CODEX, with this being the one clue where the wordplay omitted a consecutive pair of letters. It transpired that two meanings of ‘consecutive’ applied, with the missing two letters in the Wordplay being the D&E of CODEX.

As an aside, I did wonder if I could spot a hint of COLIN DEXTER hiding in this part of the grid, that finally got changed to MORSE? Perhaps coincidence?

13ac’s WOX to mean WAXED or and old word for GREW was a new one to me and an intriguing word! I wonder if I’ll remember it when it next turns up in 1000+ puzzles’ time? Knowing me, probably not!

The one clue I failed to parse properly was 27d’s:

Felt revulsion at shifting [3 4] bodies about (5).

At this stage I had HA.ED and so it was hard not to jump to the conclusion that the answer was HATED, defined by Felt revulsion (at). But [3 4] had become ‘the dead’ from the relevant Morse novel. It almost felt like the missing D&E from 14ac had reappeared here with HATED being derived from {THE (de)AD}*. No other HA.ED possibilities seemed to make sense, so HATED I entered into the grid. Don’t you just intensely dislike it when that happens? I always feel that, if you can’t parse a clue in the Listener then you may well have the answer wrong. I await the solution with interest!

I also failed to get the full significance of the Title. Auntie Google noted that The Gaudy was an Oxford college celebration of some sort and referenced one Morse story and also Dorothy L Sayers. But that is as far as I managed. ‘Enigmatic death guy‘ or similar as a description of either Morse or his creator? At this point I will stop clutching at straws!

Many thanks to Paddock (& to the editors) for another classy puzzle!

Cheers,

Tim / Encota

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One Good Turn by Paddock

Posted by shirleycurran on 18 January 2019

Paddock, indeed. We have met him other once before and, of course, Shakespeare tells us that Paddock is a toad. What do  I see at 6ac? ‘Toads hump it about (6)’ A tough clue, that, and perhaps mildly scurrilous? PIP we select for that ‘hump’ and we invert SA to give PIPAS which the Big Red Book tells me are S American toads – so are we solving the last crossword of the year on the subject of bufo bufo?

The relatively brief preamble has suggested to us that there are going to be a couple of adjustments of our grid using those six words produced by the relatively gentle Group A and Group B clues (ASAR, DROLLED, PEAT, TONAL, PROVIDE, PERSE).

Of course Paddock has renewed his membership of the Listener setters’ oenophile elite. We have ‘Elizabethan piece sorry after spilling wine (4)’ I opt for PENITENT, spilling or losing the TENT. Then we find, ‘Eg Darby and Joan clubs shunning refrigerated Aussie lagers (6)’ Those must be (C)OLDIES, and (if we ignore the E(S)AU Vichy water, ‘Texan’s second person present rising to acclaim endless source of liquor (6) gives us YOU-ALL. Cheers, Paddock!

We were solving this crossword with pencil and paper with two demanding grandchildren in the child seats as we drove to the Golden Gate Bridge (their parents involved in a house move) so I struggled to complete the top left hand side of the grid (TWIBILL, GALLINULE, AMENE?) but then saw that we had NIOBE in the centre of the grid, and that by changing the three entries spelling her name (using PEAT, DROLLED and ASAR) we produced ATLAS (all, of course skilfully maintaining real words). Now what did Niobe and ATLAS have in common? I remember Shakespeare’s ‘Like Niobe, all tears’ referring to the stone that Leto turned her into as a punishment for her hubris. Wiki tells me ‘In another story of Roman mythology Atlas refused to offer Perseus, son of Zeus, hospitality because he was told a prophecy that a son of Zeus would some day steal his daughters golden apples. Insulted, Perseus showed him the severed head of Medusa, which had the power to turn all who looked into stone. So we put a transformation to STONE in the centre of the grid.

So there we have it. PERSE replaces HARSH and gives us PERSEUS, that we must highlight, and TONAL replaces those PIPAS producing LATONA (another name for LETO). It was OVID who told us about these evil events in Greek mythology so he must be the third name we have to highlight. Aah! BROMIDE becomes PROVIDE. How very neat and what a pleasure to solve a crossword with no clue gimmicks and where all the transformations produced real words. Thank you, Paddock.

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L4535: ‘One Good Turn’ by Paddock

Posted by Encota on 18 January 2019

Fill out the grid.  Carry out the Title as an instruction.  2018 sorted.  Simples 😉

2018-12-30 20.38.54 copy

Cheers,

Tim / Encota

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